Preventing Violent Conflict. Issues from the Baltic and the Caucasus

Violent conflicts in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union have constituted a security risk demanding the highest priority for the whole of Europe. A lot remains to be done with regard to the theoretical analysis of conflicts as well as its practical application. In this volume, which focuses on the Baltic and Transcaucasus regions, the first set of results of a joint project are presented. The prospects for peace had never been greater than immediately after the Cold War. However, these initial hopes were soon shattered by the instabilities and conflicts which followed the economic and social breakdown of the Soviet Union. Violent conflicts in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union have ever since constituted a security risk demanding the highest priority for the whole of Europe. Taking this into account it was necessary not only to consider security policies such as conflict management, but also to place more weight on the use of conflict prevention. Some security relevant institutions such as the OSCE have already adopted this idea and have made conflict prevention a focal point of their activities. In a joint project the Istituto Affari Internazionali and the Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik, together with financial support by the Volkswagen Foundation, addressed the problems of conflicts prevention. In this volume, which focuses on the Baltic and Transcaucasus regions, the first set of results are presented.

A joint study of the Istituto Affari Internazionali (IAI) and theh Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik (SWP).

Details: 
Baden Baden, Nomos, January 1998, 327 p. (Aktuelle Materialien zur internationalen Politik ; 50)
In: 
ISBN/ISSN/DOI: 
3-7890-5330-9 ; 978-3-7890-5330-6
Publication date: 
01/01/1998

Preface, p. 15-16

Part I. Challenges to Conflict Prevention Policy
1. A Conceptual Framework of Conflict Prevention, Renatas Norkus, p. 19-35
2. Developing Conflict Prevention and Peacebuilding Strategies from Recent Experience in Europe, Michael S. Lund, p. 36-79
3. Norms against Violence: Intrastate Conflicts as Challenge to the Preventive Policy of the OSCE, Bernard von Plate, p. 80-98
4. Conflict Prevention in Multi-Ethnic Societies. The Impact of Democracy Building, Renée de Nevers, p. 99-132

Part II. The Impact of Conflict Prevention Policy: The Cases of the Baltic States and Georgia
5. Preventing Conflict in the Baltic States: A Success Story that Will Hold?, Renatas Norkus, p. 135-167
6. Responding to Conflicts in Georgia: A Need for Prevention?, Sopiko Shubladze, p. 168-194

Part III. Moving Beyond “Preventive Diplomacy”
7. Emerging from Conflict: The Role of the International Development Finance Institutions, Katherine Marshall, p. 197-223
8. Military Tools and CSBMs in Conflict Prevention in the Post-Soviet Area, Dmitri Trenin, p. 224-243
9. Non-Governmental Organizations as Conflict Prevention Actors in Georgia, Neil MacFarlane, p. 244-263
10. Testing Regional Cooperation and Security in the Baltic Sea Rim, Renatas Norkus, p. 264-290
11. Strategies in Ethnic Conflict and a Regional Cooperation Scheme for the Caucasus, Gevork Ter-Gabrielian, p. 291-321

Abbreviations, p. 323-325
Contributors, p. 327

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