Antitrust Institutions and Policies in the Globalising Economy

Eleonora Poli provides a coherent and comprehensive explanation of the diffusion of liberal and neo-liberal competition policies in the USA, Europe, Japan and the BRICS from an international political economy perspective. She investigates whether, how and why these countries have progressively changed their respective interpretations of market competition in light of major economic crises or political and economic issues, giving rise to the current neo-liberal era. More specifically, she analyses whether they responded to each downturn or pressure from the international arena through the enforcement of antitrust regimes and, if so, how and why specific institutional changes were implemented. In doing so, she focuses on whether policy diffusion mechanisms favoured the adoption of similar antitrust policies.

Authors: 
Details: 
Basingstoke / New York, Palgrave Macmillan, 30 October 2015, xv, 217 p. (International Political Economy Series)
ISBN/ISSN/DOI: 
978-1-137-48294-5; 978-1-137-48295-2 (ebk); 978-1-137-48296-9 (ePub)
Publication date: 
30/10/2015

List of Abbreviations
Introduction

Part I. Antitrust Institutions: Ideas, Interests and Changes
1. Perspectives on Antitrust
    Understanding antitrust: the evolution of the concept
    Approaches to antitrust
    Conclusion
2. A Variety of Ideas on Competition
   Varieties of antitrust, varieties of capitalism
   American competition policy and antitrust
   Europe, Japan and the BRICS: alternative competition theoretical and cultural frameworks
   Conclusion
3. Antitrust: Ideas, Institutions and Change
   Ideas, institutions and interests
   Institutionalisation and institutional change
   Conclusion

Part II. Antitrust Institutions in the Globalising Economy
4. The Evolution of American Antitrust Policies
   1930-1960s: The Great Depression and Harvard Competition Policy
   1970s-1990: the Chicago institutional revolution
   1990-2012: the Chicago and Post-Chicago competition tradition
   Conclusion
5. Internalising Antitrust: The Evolution of Competition Policy in Europe and Japan
   The fate of the Harvard school
   The fate of the Chicago school
   Neo-liberal era and Post-Chicago ideas
   Conclusion
6. BRICS Competition Policy in a Globalising Economy
   BRICS embryonic antitrust institutions: an overview
   From developing economies to emerging markets
   BRICS trade-off between globalisation and antitrust
   BRICS in a globalising economy
   Conclusion

Conclusions
Notes
Bibliography
Index

Research area

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